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Princess Carver

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Reply with quote  #1 

Many employers are turning to "bring your own device" policies as an answer to the increasing costs and burdens of providing devices to employees.

Just this week our company embraced this implementation which personally I do not agree. I refused to use my own gadget for work. I did not agree with their terms as they are no assurance that the company will replace my gadget in terms of damaged of wear and tear. Does your company have the same policy? Help me understand this situation. TIA

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Swallow1

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Reply with quote  #2 

@Princess Carver
Sorry, but that sounds just plain stupid to me. 

1)Wouldn't there be any concerns about hacking? 
2)What about everyone using the same level of programs? 
3)Who's paying the bills? 
4)Who's buying the products when the old ones wear out? 
5)What service package are considered "acceptable"? 
6)Does everyone have to be with the same service provider?
7)What if someone can only afford a "pay as you go service"? 


Aside from all of the above - Allowing companies access to your personal equipment also gives them access to your personal information - as in whom you speak with/when you speak with them, etc, etc.


yep - plain stupid!

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Caryl Bald

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Reply with quote  #3 
post removed due to corrupt file.
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Princess Carver

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Reply with quote  #4 
I do not want to become selfish but the company seems promoting BYOD Policy for their own respective benefit. LOL

Thanks all. [smile]
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kellex98

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Reply with quote  #5 
Most schools from elementary to post-secondary are moving to a BYOD for students.  There are usually some loaners that students who don't have their own devices can borrow in elementary, but the expectation is that they will have a device to work on.  It does not make sense for a school to have a networked (physical) computer lab anymore.  This is the same for a lot of companies.  You are constantly upgrading hardware and software, and many people do more and more of their work from home.  You have some people who prefer tablets or laptops, others prefer desktops.  Some prefer Mac products others Windows/PCs. So it is nice to work on a system that you like and prefer.  Also by students having their own devices with access to wifi in the school, they can be working on school work (research, reading, writing, etc.) in any classroom when the teacher wants them to, rather than being restricted to their couple of scheduled hours in a computer lab a week.  In my opinion, this is the best thing for schools and businesses.
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Swallow1

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Reply with quote  #6 
@kellex - for students - maybe.  For business related situations - I still don't agree. 

What happens if an employee is let go or has been moved to long/short term disability - or simply goes on vacation?  If another employee has to step in to do their job, does the employee who is going to be away have to leave their personal equipment at the office?

How do you ensure you have all the information collected on an employee's personal computer/phone/etc?  What if there is only one computer/laptop/ipad/etc being used by all family members?

I also have to wonder if this BYOD situation wouldn't turn into a hornets nest by some unions for various reasons.
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kellex98

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Reply with quote  #7 
@Swallow - you do bring up some valid points, but for many people who work on a BYOD system, they also have very flexible work schedules.  I know one person who works from home 4 days a week and then has to go to the office one day (and that is when all staff meetings are held).  Her whole office does this.  If you called any of that team, it would be automatically routed to their home phone (special ring tone)...if you email, it comes through on their device.

I also know of people (teachers) who use their devices to do all their marking and prep from home so that they don't have to stay at the school all day.  They only have to be there for their scheduled classes (it is a Post Secondary).

Is it an ideal system, who knows, but it is the way things are going.  There are different and new security systems and regulations coming up all of the time.

I also don't think it is realistic to assume a family would only have one device in the house.  My sister is a single parent with two teenagers (she works a .8 and does not have a lot of extra money).  They have 1 desktop, 3 laptops, 2 notebooks, 3 iphones, and 3 ipads.  This is the norm now...I know in my house we have a desktop, 4 laptops, 4 iphones, and 3 ipads and there are 2 adults and one teenager - who now needs a Surface Pro for University.
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Swallow1

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Reply with quote  #8 
@kellex98

Don't you think that a company allowing you to carry confidential information on your personal device(s):

1) helps track your whereabouts,
2) increases productivity without overtime payment 
3) increases software support issues,
4) ensures device compatibility
5) allows the company access to personal information
6) figures out who pays for the devices themselves
7) deals with liability for lost or hacked company data
8) figures out how to divide billing charges between personal and company related information
9) works with software companies to ensure they get their cut of all software product licences.

Then, I am pretty sure there are union related concerns somewhere in there, as well.

IMHO, BYOD is better for the company than it is for the employee.

I worked from home on a full time basis for approx. 4 years and had no issues whatsoever.  The difference was that the company supplied all devices from printers, to laptop, to cellphone, to even my desk chair and whatever else I needed.

Prior to that, I had a laptop & cell devices (when I was out and about), and a desktop for the office Bluetooth headset - basically - the works. 

Right now, we have a desktop, iPad, plain old cellphone (that I rarely use) and a  button in the car to place or answer calls.  My spouse has a work cellphone.

Nowadays, we don't find it necessary to be tied to a computer or phone 24/7.  Heck, we don't even bother with call display!

ON THE OTHER HAND -  I truly believe that our kids would wither and die without 24/7 access to their phones, laptops, ipads, etc and heaven only knows what else. 
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kellex98

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Reply with quote  #9 
I like being able to work when I want...and most people put in an honest day's work. I don't think the company expects overtime, or to be able to reach me at any time. I am a night person though and would rather answer emails at 2:00 am and not start work until after lunch. I know for us we have to sign paperwork every year re:FOIP and security, that says we are securely storing materials etc. We pay for our own devices, the company pays for software, upgrades, etc. It for sure saves the company money, otherwise they would not do it. I am middle aged, but I love being connected all the time. [wink]
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Swallow1

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Reply with quote  #10 
You say the company pays for your software upgrades, but you pay for your devices? Do they tell you:
1) what sort of equipment you are required to purchase to ensure compatibility? 
2) where to send your bills? 
3) how much they'll pay for your services?
4) how to divide your personal from work related calls?  

All of these things services and devices and can be supplied by the company. 

Isn't it a lot like stores charging you 0.5 per grocery bag, then expecting you to bag your own groceries, ring purchases through on your own and pay for the privilege of advertising for that particular company?  Who's paying you?

Whether you believe it or not, more people spend a greater amount of time working during their so called "family time", just because the equipment is there and it's weighing on your mind to get it done.

As far as FOIP and security paperwork are concerned, it is rather obvious that many people don't even know what these items are or how they are should be used properly.   Just ask our city administrative staff and see what sort of answers you get.
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kellex98

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi Swallow,

We have to take a FOIP course with lots of reading and a test at the end and we need 80% to pass. The certificate gets put on our HR file. This certification needs to be renewed yearly, so I feel like the majority of our employees are up on the FOIP legislation.

They don't tell us what to buy necessarily, just what it has to be capable of doing (ie: what memory is needed, what programs (Adobe Reader, Java, etc). They provide the software. Bills are expensed, half of our internet bill and cell bill. I am paid a salary, so I need to get my work done...some weeks this can be done in 30 hours in the week, other weeks during peak times it might be 60...but it averages out to a normal amount of work (I also get three months of paid holidays a year). So I don't mind putting in some extra hours over the other nine months.

Regarding separating personal from work calls, this is an issue in the office even, or on equipment they supply. You are either a person who takes personal calls during "work" time or you aren't..
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