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Head Honcho

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Reply with quote  #1 
Today I received an email from the Full House Lottery that reads as follows:

Dear Full House Customer: 
 
We believe you may have been affected by a criminal breach of this year’s Full House Lottery website, which involved online purchases from February 23, 2017 to May 2, 2017.
 
You are receiving this notice because you made a purchase in this time period and your credit card and other information may have been compromised.
 
Please immediately advise your issuing credit card institution about this. They can advise you on the steps you should take, including how to confirm any transactions on your card.
 
This is the specific information which could be involved:
  • Your name
  • Billing address
  • Email address
  • Phone number(s)
  • Credit card information – including card type, card number, card holder name, expiry date and CVV
  • Gender, age (if provided)
  • Amount of your purchase
We sincerely apologize for this breach. We have notified the Edmonton Police Service and other authorities. We are taking a number of steps, with the support of national cyber security experts, to prevent such a breach from occurring again in the future.
 
If you have any questions, please let us know. You can respond to us by email or call our Customer Service Centre at 780.426.6161 (Edmonton and area) or toll free at 1.800.441.0465.
 
We truly appreciate your ongoing support of Full House Lottery and our two important causes.
 
Sincerely,
Full House Lottery

I called my bank's toll free credit card centre and my card is now cancelled.

Someone in New York had tried to make an online cash transfer using my card. CIBC intercepted the request and disallowed it when the person could not answer the security questions and PIN number tied to the card.

If you bought a Full House lottery ticket using your credit card online in the time frame above, please be sure to take appropriate measures with your bank.

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trish0112

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Reply with quote  #2 
Please take time to read this as well...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/lottery-cyber-security-breach-full-house-1.4102134
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Head Honcho

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Reply with quote  #3 
Since I was directly affected and went through the entire process with my gold VISA, if anyone else was one of the 28,000 I can offer a couple of tips. First, deal directly with your bank first and get the card cancelled and replaced. that way you are protected.

A word of caution, the bank advised me to put a notice on my accounts at Canada's two main credit agencies. This turned out to be the most frustrating part of the exercise. All they wanted was for me to pay $5.25 each to place a warning on my account, then demanded all kinds of documentation via fax and wound up costing me $40 for 10 pages of forums to each agency. Then they claimed the faxes were not legible enough as sent by Staples at $2 per page. So after paying the fees, I still had no warnings on my account which amounts to a phone call to me if anyone attempts to open credit accounts using my old card. I gave up as a rip off and decided the protection my credit card offered was enough. Just one more money grab for anyone in trouble by credit agencies. They refused to take the info by phone even when I suggested they call me back using their current file data. Grrrrrr.
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Willy

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head Honcho
Since I was directly affected and went through the entire process with my gold VISA, if anyone else was one of the 28,000 I can offer a couple of tips. First, deal directly with your bank first and get the card cancelled and replaced. that way you are protected.

A word of caution, the bank advised me to put a notice on my accounts at Canada's two main credit agencies. This turned out to be the most frustrating part of the exercise. All they wanted was for me to pay $5.25 each to place a warning on my account, then demanded all kinds of documentation via fax and wound up costing me $40 for 10 pages of forums to each agency. Then they claimed the faxes were not legible enough as sent by Staples at $2 per page. So after paying the fees, I still had no warnings on my account which amounts to a phone call to me if anyone attempts to open credit accounts using my old card. I gave up as a rip off and decided the protection my credit card offered was enough. Just one more money grab for anyone in trouble by credit agencies. They refused to take the info by phone even when I suggested they call me back using their current file data. Grrrrrr.


HH in the future, if you wish to fax something, I have a fax machine at home you can use for free. CAll ahead and bring your stuff on over.
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Head Honcho

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Reply with quote  #5 
Many thanks Willy, I shall store that in my memory bank.

They even charged me double the local rate for long distance when they went to 1-800 numbers. I tried to explain that there is no charge for those numbers to the young lady, but the address on the faxes read Toronto in each case and that she insisted that it is long distance and thus $2 a page, not $1.
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Joyce

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Reply with quote  #6 
I just teceived a call from Stars Saskatchewan telling me I won the early bird draw. When I said I hadn't bought a ticket it suddenly became the Stars Alberta Lottery. They're at it again.
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Swallow1

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Reply with quote  #7 
HH - It's quite disconcerting to find that using our credit cards to purchase tickets has become so dangerous.

Take for instance, the message that states:

This is the specific information which could be involved:
  • Your name
  • Billing address
  • Email address
  • Phone number(s)
  • Credit card information – including card type, card number, card holder name, expiry date and CVV
  • Gender, age (if provided)
  • Amount of your purchase
Yet, when we receive messages from various credit card companies concerning "phishing", they specifically state things like:

"RBC will never send a regular email that asks you to provide, confirm or verify personal, login or account information. Also, RBC will never include a link to an online service in a regular email and ask you to sign in using that link. If you receive an email of this type, that appears to be from RBC, please forward it to phishing@rbc.com and then delete it. For more information please visit Email & Website Fraud."

When speaking to a representative of RBC, I was informed that these fraud merchants have found a way to transfer phone numbers like RBC's.  Then, when the line is picked up, it's transferred to their phone number.

I apologize if I've misunderstood your message.
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